China refused to buy grain from Russia, - Bloomberg

China refused to buy grain from Russia, - Bloomberg

China has refused to buy Russian grain, despite the fact that the country could become the largest buyer of staple foods this season, and Russia - the largest exporter.

 

 This is reported by Bloomberg.

 

 As the publication notes, China buys a lot of wheat, while the total volume of imports increased by more than 60% compared to last year and amounted to about 6 million tons in the first four months of the year. Russia had very little of them - 30,000 tons.

 

 Although Beijing said last year it would allow imports from all parts of Russia, trade has been hampered by a host of issues, including phytosanitary regulations and transport issues.

 

 Wheat is an exception to trade between China and Russia. Beijing's purchases of electricity and aluminum have surged as sanctions have cut supplies to the West.

 

 Future wheat and meat supplies are likely to be on the agenda when Russian government officials and executives attend a business forum in China this week, according to Agriculture Minister Dmytro Patrushev.

 

 It will be recalled that the Prime Minister of Russia Mykhailo Mishustin will lead a government delegation to China to participate in the business forum together with businessmen who are under sanctions.

 

 China's exports to Russia hit a record in April, rising 153% from a year earlier to $9.6 billion, while the world's second-largest economy imported $9.6 billion of oil, gas and other goods.





China has refused to buy Russian grain, despite the fact that the country could become the largest buyer of staple foods this season, and Russia - the largest exporter.

 

 This is reported by Bloomberg.

 

 As the publication notes, China buys a lot of wheat, while the total volume of imports increased by more than 60% compared to last year and amounted to about 6 million tons in the first four months of the year. Russia had very little of them - 30,000 tons.

 

 Although Beijing said last year it would allow imports from all parts of Russia, trade has been hampered by a host of issues, including phytosanitary regulations and transport issues.

 

 Wheat is an exception to trade between China and Russia. Beijing's purchases of electricity and aluminum have surged as sanctions have cut supplies to the West.

 

 Future wheat and meat supplies are likely to be on the agenda when Russian government officials and executives attend a business forum in China this week, according to Agriculture Minister Dmytro Patrushev.

 

 It will be recalled that the Prime Minister of Russia Mykhailo Mishustin will lead a government delegation to China to participate in the business forum together with businessmen who are under sanctions.

 

 China's exports to Russia hit a record in April, rising 153% from a year earlier to $9.6 billion, while the world's second-largest economy imported $9.6 billion of oil, gas and other goods.